English 11 Forum

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    • You have not included any direct quotations to support your claims.
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    • It can also be an allegory for man's arrogance/pride, and the dangers of putting too much faith in science (instead of God).
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    • Glad to see you putting in the page number.
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    • His wife is an allegorical symbol for Mother Britain.
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    • The inability to play God, or the danger of the human desire to do so?
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    • Well done. It's as though Rip's daughter and husband have succeeded just as de Crevecoeur wrote about in his "Letter From an American Farmer"
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    • "Could be setbacks or punishments"? I'd say Hawthorne is saying there WILL be negative consequences if humans try to achieve perfection, as God alone is perfect.
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    • That's a very insightful first paragraph, Hannah. Well done.
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    • "No one can ever be as perfect as God." You've said it perfectly, Danielle. (See what I did there?)
  • One of the more clear allegories is that of Frankenstein, in which Alymer is the mad scientist, Aminadab is Igor, and Georgiana as Frankenstein.
    "Forthwith there issued from an inner apartment a man of low stature, but bulky frame, with shaggy hair hanging about his visage, which was Alymer's underworker during his whole scientific career, and was admirably fitted for that office by his great mechanical readiness, and the skill with which, while incapable of comprehending a single principle, he executed all the details of his master's experiments."
    This is a very clear allegory, if you had ever heard about Frankenstein, then you would have known about Igor, the mad scientist's assistant. Aminadab in this story is Alymer's assistant, and definitely resembles Igor. Then the text goes on to point out another example,
    "Yes, master," answered Aminadab, looking intently at the lifeless form of Georgiana; and then he muttered to himself, "If she were my wife, I'd never part with that birthmark."
    In the story of Frankenstein, Igor refers to the scientist as master, and so does Aminadab.
    Alymer seems to try to play the role of god, which usually doesn't end too well.
    Alymer bade her cast her eyes upon a vessel containing a quantity of earth. She did so with little interest at first; but was soon startled to perceive the germ of a plant shooting upward from the soil. Then came the slender stalk; the leaves gradually unfolded themselves; and amid them was a perfect and lovely flower. "It is magical!" cried Georgiana. "I dare not touch it." "Nay, pluck it," answered Alymer,-"pluck it, and inhale its brief perfume while you may. The flower will wither in a few moments and leave nothing save its brown seed vessels; but thence may be perpetuated race as ephemeral as itself."
    In this paragraph, Alymer had created a flower that would rapidly grow and then rapidly die. Normally it is god that would create and decide how fast a plant would grow. Even Georgiana was startled by this.
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